Recommendations for space opera

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  • #204218
    jhmcmullen
    Participant
    • Topics - 35
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    So recently I’ve been jonesing for something in the old-fashioned space opera field (Anderson’s Flandry stories, Norton’s time traders, etc.) Maybe they don’t write them that way any more–I’m ignorant. What should I be reading for that feel?

    Peter F. Hamilton? Peter Watts? Iain Banks? Names I haven’t even heard of?

    Mods, move this if it’s in the wrong place.

    John

    Great at theory, terrible at practice.

    #254015
    ErinMH
    Moderator
    • Topics - 405
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    Check out Jen Foehner Wells’ Fluency and Remanence.

    Also check out Nathan Lowell’s Trader Tales, starting with Quarter Share — and have you read LJ Cohen’s Halcyone Space books?

    #254016
    jhmcmullen
    Participant
    • Topics - 35
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    I am ignorant of all of these names.

    Elsewhere, I have had recommended Neal Asher, Charles Stross, Peter F. Hamilton, Alistair Reynolds, and Iain M Banks.

    Great at theory, terrible at practice.

    #254017
    ErinMH
    Moderator
    • Topics - 405
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    Jen Wells is very new — I think her first came out last year, maybe the year before?

    LJ Cohen is an FM member from way back. Her username might be ljcblue?

    Nathan Lowell’s indie, got his start doing his books in audio via Podiobooks and has three interrelated series going now.

    Sorry, I was giving you more recommendations, not commenting on the ones you already received.

    Peter Watts includes a lot of biology in his stories, and I think they veer toward the dark.

    Charles Stross has an intellectual approach to his writing., which, much as I like it in general, I can only take in small doses. I do love his Laundry Files series, though it’s somewhat Lovecraftian.

    Iain M. Banks’ Culture novels are good space opera that don’t have to be read in order. They’re not light reads for me — he’s got a lot going on, and I have to pay careful attention.

    Alastair Reynolds’ work reminds me of a blend of Niven, Cordwainer Smith, and New Weird. Fun stuff, and definitely not exactly like anything else out there.

    I don’t know Hamilton’s work.

    I’ve heard good things about Asher, have a book by him in my reading queue, but haven’t read it yet.

    I’ll also say if you haven’t read Vernor Vinge, you should definitely look up his work.

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