An odd question about prolific writers

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  • #234368
    kitkat
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    Though I am new here I wanted to put something out there since I am disabled and my POV is different than others. I do get jealous of those who can write so much without their health getting in the way, but I have no reason to dislike their success. Once we accept our own limitations-not an easy thing, we can make the best use of our writing time.

    #234369
    Octavus
    Participant
    • Topics - 4
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    First thought on the prolific? Teach me. I am grasshopper.

    #236086
    zette
    Moderator
    • Topics - 580
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    LOL. Okay.

    Three things:

    1 — Get serious about what you write. Don’t just think about writing, and don’t write random stuff just to say you’re writing. Prolific only works if you finish projects.

    2 — Write every day. Start with a low word count and work up. I started at 250 words a day and now I average about 3k a day.

    3 — You have to want to write and enjoy the stories you are telling. If you don’t love what you’re doing, you might force yourself to be prolific, but it would hardly be worth it and I doubt anyone could hold on to that title for long under those circumstances.

    #234370
    Annika
    Participant
    • Topics - 24
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    My first thought about prolific writers is that I admire them and that I hope I’ll one day be able to do it, too (still a long way, but I think I’m getting a little better at it).

    But I’ve come across the negative prejudice that has been mentioned, too. Even in NaNo. In the German regional forums (my home region – I write English but still enjoy hanging out there because of write-ins and similar things) it is particularly bad – people will accuse you of demoralising them with your word count, of writing crap because you’re fast, etc etc. I try not to let it bother me, but sometimes it does. I can honestly say that the quality of my writing is pretty much the same whether I write 100, 1k or 10k words a day – maybe I’ll make a bit more typos and silly spelling mistakes if I write more quickly, but those are so easily fixed that the extra productivity is more than worth it. In terms of content and prose I don’t really notice a difference. But I have a feeling that many people don’t believe me and I keep having to justify myself. And I’m not even that fast.

    #236087
    ErinMH
    Moderator
    • Topics - 405
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    Check out 2k to 10k by Rachel Aaron.

    Also, it’s out of print, but occasionally the e-book Way of the Ceetah by Lynn Viehl is available on her blog, Paperback Writer.

    #236094
    MarFisk
    Moderator
    • Topics - 558
    • Replies - 15,536

    Specifically on the NaNo side, I did have to remind our region coordinator not to focus on the numbers as much because it demoralizes people who are slower and encourages people to overdo it despite hand pain, but luckily I saw a lot of envy but no condemnation :). I fell into both groups myself. Started out strong then tanked my arms (my fault not anyone else’s, but enough to remind others to pay attention).

    She remakes mechanical devices, and he dreams of becoming a steamship captain in The Steamship Chronicles. Book 1 is free in eBook.
    https://margaretmcgaffeyfisk.com/the-steamship-chronicles/

    #235527
    quiethearted
    Participant
    • Topics - 1
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    I am both disabled and a prolific writer, if by that you mean someone who can create most works almost start to finish one behind the other. Let me tell you, the two do not co-exist easily. I tend to write short work in one sitting, be it 20 words or 20k words. I have to force myself to stop, get up and move around or I know I won’t be able to at the end. Unfortunately, I’ve found over the last few years I write less and less because I know once I’m in that zone I’m lost to any world but the one I’m creating. Its also made it very hard to write novel length fiction. That was true even before the disability. If I walk away I can’t always pick back up.

    And to get back on topic, I have noticed a certain…”feeling” from fellow writing friends when we talk about our work and I’ve been in that zone for a while. I don’t know how to explain what I do, or how I do it. I just do. It doesn’t make my work better or worse than anyone else’s. It just means more of it shows up faster. It’s also very hard to edit later. It comes out tight and in one long vision, so its hard to find places to add or change without ending up writing something entirely different. I find myself envious of writers who can take more time, work in shorter spans and keep the continuity and flow. I just can’t manage it.

    #236104
    Ashe Elton Parker
    Moderator
    • Topics - 424
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    One thing I find that helped me come out of the zone (back when I still had a job or school) was setting an alarm. Whether it was on a kitchen timer or a digital clock, as long as I set it for a reasonable amount of time so I’d come out of the zone in time to get plenty of sleep.

    Ashe Elton Parker
    "There's someone in my head, but it's not me." ~ from the song Brain Damage by Pink Floyd
    ~*~
    Member since 1998.
    ~*~
    Look me up on Wattpad for some of my books!
    #236105
    quiethearted
    Participant
    • Topics - 1
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    I’ve done that too, but I’ve found I lose the thread if I don’t carry it to a natural conclusion. I have several long works that are stalled for that reason.

    #236106
    Magic Seeker
    Moderator
    • Topics - 80
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    I use a timer, too, or I’ll sit so long I can’t stand up.

    But I agree with Quiethearted: once I’m out of the zone, it’s hard to pick up the story again. Sometimes it helps to stop writing in the middle of the sentence. Usually it helps if I have a strong idea about what should happen next. I’m a hardcore plotter for just that reason.

    I’m not prolific at all. I’m desperately envious of those who are, but I keep plugging along at my own pace. :)

    Happy writing,
    Deb Salisbury
    The Mantua-Maker, Quality Historical Sewing Patterns and Books
    www.mantua-maker.com

    The Art of the Hoop: 1860 - 1869, Dress, Sewing, and Clothing Care Advice
    https://www.mantua-maker.com/a---1860s-fashion.html

    Dead Wizard's Loot: Wizard Whitewing #1
    http://www.djsalisburybooks.com/Dead-Wizard-s-Loot.html

    #235528
    J.A. Marlow
    Moderator
    • Topics - 311
    • Replies - 1,099

    That and keep it fun. :)

    J.A. Marlow
    The String Weavers, Salmon Run, Redpoint One series.

    Writer alter-ego of Dreamers Cove

    #234489
    J.A. Marlow
    Moderator
    • Topics - 311
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    Because of this, I’m changing how I release series now. My intention is that any new series will have the first three stories finished so I can release them all at the same time. That way, right from the start, there is enough ‘meat’ for a new reader to get into. Takes a little more time at the front-end, but I’ve heard good success using this method.

    J.A. Marlow
    The String Weavers, Salmon Run, Redpoint One series.

    Writer alter-ego of Dreamers Cove

    #236116
    Ashe Elton Parker
    Moderator
    • Topics - 424
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    This is why I want to finish a lot of books before I begin publishing. I want to have at least 1 complete series (DH) or a combination of trilogies/duologies/standalones for slamming out entire series all at once the first 2-4 months.

    And that’s mainly because I may be quite prolific with ideas, but I’m not quite so much with completing things and I don’t want to leave readers hanging for long periods between series books.

    Ashe Elton Parker
    "There's someone in my head, but it's not me." ~ from the song Brain Damage by Pink Floyd
    ~*~
    Member since 1998.
    ~*~
    Look me up on Wattpad for some of my books!
    #234371
    LCAisling
    Participant
    • Topics - 11
    • Replies - 76

    It used to freak me out to be honest. Because there are many in romance section, who have books coming out almost monthly, it did create question to me if there is quality behind quantity. However, in today’s changing times when quantity often defines if you’re in public’s eye for more than one book and having several years – or even months – between books can mean that you might lose your reader, who have already moved on, I find it to be somewhat a norm.

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