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Lobby 2. Welcome The Reading Room Reading Challenges, 2010 topic #84
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Subject: "cousinjenny's 2010 reading list (25 ... 50 ... other?)" Previous topic | Next topic
Mesg #84 "cousinjenny's 2010 reading list (25 ... 50 ... other?)"
Author CousinJenny     Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list
Author Info Member since Dec 23rd 2009
17 posts
Date Wed Jan-06-10 10:24 AM
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Mon Jan-25-10 12:15 PMby CousinJenny

I read a fair bit - I know it's normally well over 50 a year, but will drop as I've taken on a couple of new challenges this year.

Rather than give a number, let's see how far I get!



1. A Short Account of the History of Mathematics - W W Rouse Ball
2. The Mistress of Hanover Square by Anne Herries
3. The Wide Awake Girls in Winsted - Katharine Ruth Ellis

  

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Mesg #165 "A Short Account of the History of Mathematics by W W Ro..."
Author CousinJenny     Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list
Author Info Member since Dec 23rd 2009
17 posts
Date Tue Jan-19-10 09:19 AM
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In response to Reply # 0

As a first one completed this year I know it sounds impressive, but it isn't really. I've had to skim over the equations, Latin and Greek.

This was originally published in 1908 (and looks from the footnotes as if it was revised in 1921/22) and is now a public domain book.

I was doing a read-through for someone, to pick up any last typos in the text, before it's posted on Project Gutenberg in the near future. Although I'm no mathematician, Professor Rouse Ball is a great writer and I've found it really entertaining. As well as the dryer factual matters he included details from the lives of the mathematicians studied. There are mathematicians throwing their sons out for disagreeing with them, mathematicians dying in duels, mathematicians being petty and sarcastic about and to each other. Great fun (honest!!)

  

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Mesg #216 "RE: A Short Account of the History of Mathematics by W ..."
Author Stavechurch     Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list
Author Info Member since Dec 15th 2009
612 posts
Date Tue Jan-26-10 06:21 PM
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It does sound great fun! Mathematicians are evidently not as dry and dusty as their stereotype suggests!

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Mesg #171 "The Mistress of Hanover Square by Anne Herries"
Author CousinJenny     Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list
Author Info Member since Dec 23rd 2009
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Date Tue Jan-19-10 02:42 PM
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And as a complete contrast (as light relief from the mathematics) a Mills & Boon Regency romance!

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Mesg #210 "The Wide Awake Girls"
Author CousinJenny     Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list
Author Info Member since Dec 23rd 2009
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Date Mon Jan-25-10 12:30 PM
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Initially published in 1908 this is a book for children about the adventures of some young people as they set up a library in their town. Wide Awake was a juvenile periodical which included stories and poems (on 'improving' lines) as well as games and the four girls at the centre of the story met in ways related to this periodical. This is another one I was giving a read through before it goes up to Project Gutenberg, I did like it, but couldn't see today's children liking it at all. The "children" - who were 16/17 years old and very childish compared to today's teenagers - are very sententious and given to moralizing.

You might ask why I am reading these old books. Well, Project Gutenberg is a voluntary effort to preserve public domain material and make it available to everyone in the world, free of charge, via the internet. Many of the books there are provided by individual volunteers, but a lot are provided by Distributed Proofreaders (DP) - another voluntary effort. DP volunteers scan in old books, journals etc as pictures, convert the pictures to text, check the text against the images of the original pages and upload the checked book to Project Gutenberg. The work is distributed across all the volunteers on the site, and the final part of the process for many of the books is "smooth reading", where one or more people pick up a book to read through for any remaining errors that jump out at you as you read. I like smooth reading, because I can do it when I'm not connected to the internet (basically if I'm not at work, I'm not connected). It's fun (really!)

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