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Lobby 2. Welcome Main Community Discussion Board topic #91018
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Subject: "How mysteries are solved" Previous topic | Next topic
Mesg #91018 "How mysteries are solved"
Author Weird Jim     Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list
Author Info Member since Jun 13th 2002
6262 posts
Date Tue Jun-26-12 05:21 PM
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Are you a mystery writer (readers should look away)?

This writer claims there are only four methods of ending a mystery. However, I suspect they've chosen their examples from TV because most of them are similar to TV endings, which I've always thought were bad, probably because of time limitations. Although that doesn't excuse the two-parters that are usually just as bad. ("Oh! Is that what you think detective? You're quite right. Here's my confesion. Get it typed up and I'll be only too happy to sign it.")

Anyway, it's motive (why), and method (how) that normally makes the story interesting.

http://www.themillions.com/2012/06/the-games-afoot-the-case-of-the-mystery-genres-terrible-secret.html

Weird Jim

"Good reading is the only test of good writing"
Robertson Davies. A voice from the attic 1960

  

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Mesg #91026 "RE: How mysteries are solved"
Author Chevaliersg     Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list
Author Info Member since May 14th 2005
711 posts
Date Wed Jun-27-12 04:17 AM
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In response to Reply # 0

I am addicted to a cable the I.D. cable network. Although I still feel they gloss over the real grunt work, they do a bang up job of showing how investigations go right or wrong.

As a former Cop, I can tell you that a murder investigation does not get resolved in 44 minutes.

I've seen detectives crawl on all fours with their nose inches from the ground. I, myself, had to wade through garbage bins, mud holes and not a few chicken coops (moonshiners, they don't just live in the Appalachians).

T.V. and other fiction media always like to talk about the "one case" that keeps you up at night. In truth, most Cops have 30 or 40 cases that keep them up all week.

The article you provided did go down the list of the "formulaic" endings for mysteries.

Me, I tend to think there is no "end" to a mystery but just a trial and (if you're lucky)
a conviction.

You're never really going to know what a murder's motive is. Even the murderer sometimes. Like Brenda Ann Spencer who said she went on a killing spree because she didn't like Mondays.

I guess this author who wrote the article on endings just wanted to help fledgling mystery writers find an ending to their work.

Me, I think it's more compelling not to have a real ending. A reckoning perhaps; pointing a true course that the story will fade toward.

But that's just me, I could be wrong .



Rem tene; verba sequentur (Grasp the subject; the words will come)


Chev

  

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Mesg #91027 "RE: How mysteries are solved"
Author RavenCorbie     Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list Click to send message via AOL IM
Author Info Member since Oct 17th 2005
7824 posts
Date Wed Jun-27-12 10:48 AM
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In response to Reply # 1


Me, I think it's more compelling not to have a real ending. A reckoning perhaps; pointing a true course that the story will fade toward.


Yes! I love endings like that. Sometimes, I also like more traditional wrap-everything-up endings, but I really like the endings that leave something left, that linger with questions. Those are the ones that stick in my mind longer, so I'd agree that they are definitely more compelling.

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Mesg #91028 "RE: How mysteries are solved"
Author bonniers     Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author Click to view this author's profile Click to add this author to your buddy list Click to send message via AOL IM
Author Info Member since Dec 01st 2003
25849 posts
Date Wed Jun-27-12 11:50 AM
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In response to Reply # 0

Wed Jun-27-12 11:51 AMby bonniers

Snicker. That's pretty funny.

I notice that most of the forensics-based crime shows simply replace Sherlock Holmes with a crime lab and a computer database.

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