Lazette Gifford
Publisher & Editor
zette@cableone.net

 

Website Review:

Agent Query

By Shana Perry Norris
2006,
Shana Perry Norrs


http://www.agentquery.com

So you've written your novel. You've toiled over the revisions and now it's the best it can be. Your novel is ready to make its world debut.

Now what?

Agent Query  aims to help writers with the part that comes next: finding an agent and getting your work out in the public eye.  This website boasts a searchable database of over 700 literary agents. Best of all, the site is completely free to use. The agents listed include fiction and nonfiction in a wide variety of genres, so you're certain to find one that suits your needs.

The front page of Agent Query highlights recent updates to the agent database and explains what updates have been made. If an agent is new to the database, a note under Comments will say so. Other updates might include noting that an agent is no longer accepting e-mail queries or is working only with previously published authors.

To delve deeper into the site and search the database, there are two options. The easiest method is to use the Quick Agent Search found on the left side of any page. You can type in a keyword and select a genre from the fiction or nonfiction lists or select only a genre without entering a keyword. Click the Quick Search button and you'll instantly be given a list of results that fit your needs.

If you'd like to search two or more genres at once or would like to narrow down your search to agents that fit specific criteria, click the Full Search link. On this search page, you can enter keywords to search by and select several genres in both fiction and nonfiction.  In addition, you can limit your search to only members of AAR, agents who accept email queries, and those who are actively seeking new clients.

Once you hit the search button, you'll see a listing of results that match your search criteria. The top right corner displays how many pages your search resulted in. For instance, if you select "Fantasy" from the fiction list and then click search, you'll be given 12 pages of agents representing this genre (at the time of this writing). With eight agents listed on each page, that's at least 88 potential agents for your fantasy novel. (The last page of results may contain fewer than eight listings.)

The search results display as a brief bio of each agent. Click on the Full Profile link to see more information, such as special interests, submission guidelines, other links pertaining to this agent, and previous sales.

All of this valuable information is right at your fingertips in an easy to use format. If Agent Query had stopped right there, most writers would be happy with their offerings. But the site also provides other resources for writers. You can read advice on writing queries or submitting to agents. Other pages list links to major publishers, indie presses, and a selection of literary magazines. The site has also collected links to other sites of interest to writers.

With all of this information wrapped up into one website, Agent Query is a resource you're certain to use again and again in your quest for publication.

Agent Query-- http://www.agentquery.com